Friday, 20 October 2017

medley

Pin It now!
The medley is limited to my newest clover wreath pattern. 


This medallion has turned out to be quite versatile. 
When I started out with the intention of using clovers to enclose a central space, I winged the stitchcount and pattern and it didn’t need any changes or retro-tatting ... 

... except adding joining picots to stabilize the center.
Yes, you guessed right. I deliberately chose Christmasy colours for the pattern 
to go with the name ;-P
Placed a lone rosette in center to see the effect. 

Red and gree also remind me of poinsettias ! 
All it needed was a touch of yellow in the center. Beads to the rescue.

With 3 medallions made, it was time for some more play. 
I noticed how snuggly the hexagons fit together for a larger mat.

A tiny picot on the ‘leaves’ to attach adjacent medallions.
Immediately started to work on the larger coaster, using 3 strands of embroidery thread. 

Attaching linearly this could well become a broad insertion, bookmark, belt, hairband, etc. 
Multiple rows could create a table runner, a cornered mat. 
It would leave some empty spaces to fill in, though.

So far I've attached 3, then stopped to do a teensy bit of experimentation before I write and share the pattern. 


Sharon makes a valid observation – Don’t all medallions have enclosed spaces?
Oh, yes ! And I should’ve included this in my study instead of simply listing Nicholls’ categorization.
All medallions have enclosed space. The difference in the 3 groups is this :
  1. Central Ring group – space is enclosed within one ring
  2. Enclosed Space group – space is enclosed by multiple elements (on the ‘outside’)
  3. Central Picot group – space is enclosed within one large picot
Does this make sense ?


whatever the tune played, a tatting medley is always melodious !

Related Posts

Thursday, 19 October 2017

and another

Pin It now!
Medallions are complete in themselves, yet lend themselves to various uses. Most commonly we see them as centers in snowflakes, doilies, etc. At other times they act as motifs joined or tiled to create larger mats, etc.
For example this …
Rosette center
by Carla

It works well as a stand-alone piece (medallion) but also great when more are joined around (as motifs) – see Carla’s model and pattern


This is one of those designs that always appeals to me. Elegant arches and offset rings. 
And the negative space in center (enclosed space) takes on a different shape depending on the number of rings - 
A triangle with 3 large rings ; a square with 4 large rings, and here a cute little flower is formed!

Tatted with 3 strands of Anchor embroidery thread for a choice of colours, although colour fidelity is missing in the photographs.


As often happens we name a  pattern 'rosette' for the visual effect, but technically this one is a medallion with an enclosed space formed by inward facing rings.

Rosette is often used in tatting literature. It represents 3 forms (each a medallion in itself) – 
  • a single ring with picots ; 
  • close outward facing rings in a circle ; 
  • a central ring with close chains lock joined to the picots (as in the famous Sitka Rose by Georgia Seitz).

A medallion is made of pattern repeats called motifs. Yet a medallion itself can become a motif in a larger pattern/design when it is repeated and joined.

I had loaded my shuttles to work Carla's larger pattern, but I discovered my Clover Wreath works well as a motif, too. So I switched to the latter and will share in next post, along with a Christmasy version.

Also relieved at finally finishing the medallion document - there is a short note on rosettes, too. It took a long time with lots and lots of tweaks, but I am finally happy with it. And in the process I have learned a great deal myself. Have sent it to Susan Fuller and will share it here after she discusses it in design class.

Many many thanks to Carla for sharing this lovely pattern  :-) 

happy tatting :-)

Tuesday, 17 October 2017

meddling with medallions

Pin It now!

Going over the medallions document, I realized that it needed more samples – visuals are so much better than words. Excited, I got down to it. Here are a few of them.

Most of the samples in the document seemed to have single rings around the center. But trefoils, clovers, layered rings (ANKAR style), etc. can also form an enclosed space. So I created this pattern using inward facing clovers. There are thrown rings on the chains.
‘Tis the season, hence I’m calling it the Clover Wreath. Wouldn’t it work well as the center of another doily ?! The large rings need to be joined, though.


Now here’s something I don’t remember ever doing – a Central/common Picot on a Chain.

I tried to create my own pattern with 1 horizontal and 1 vertical ring on each ‘spoke’, but it wasn’t working (do you have any idea why?). Finally I took the design idea from the model #69 in Elgiva Nicholl’s ‘Tatting: Technique and History’ but used my own stitch-count and single decorative picots.

TIP: For straight chains, avoid snugging the chain too tight – we don’t want it to curve/arch. 

A central ring with picots (also called rosette by Mlle Riego) is a common feature of many patterns. Traditionally it was tatted separately. Now we have multiple options to incorporate it without cutting off thread : climb out with a mock picot ; work it as a mock ring ; and so on.

In this square, the central ring is thrown off the first chain -
When I was first learning split rings during Jane's TIAS 2014, I attempted the Fandango coaster to practice on the side. So not happy with the working ! Time to try it again. Much better.

This is a Classic Tatted Daisy. It starts with a central ring with picots. Then we add a round of outward facing rings – lock joined to the picots and separated by bare thread. Traditionally it was worked as separate rounds and with a single shuttle, hence bare thread separates adjoining rings.

Now we make it in one pass and the bare thread is sometimes substituted with chains.

Incidentally, my Aspiration Doily (trial 2) now has a Daisy center ! It is a modern construction using 2 shuttles (or a long tail for shuttle 1) with the outward rings/petals thrown off the central mock ring (SCMR).
It lies flat and the center is more solid than bare threads between rings in previous trial. 

And here’s another interesting variation :
a central ring with picots, surrounded by concentric chains, lock joined to picots on previous rounds, and a final round tatted like the traditional daisy petals with bare thread and lock joins !
So, the rosette turns into a daisy !
(a central ring with closely packed chains around it is Also called a rosette!)

These were tatted over 15 years ago when I had no notion of a lot of tatting techniques nor how to hide ends. You can clearly see spiraling rounds rather than discreet ones. Although I did get better over time and in one of the size 40 yellow ones (made a few years after the size 20 red), the inner circle is almost round with equal-size picots.

Pattern is part of a lace from ‘Tatting Favourites’ by Anchor Design Center. Each medallion is worked in 2 parts but I now realise that the outermost rings can be worked as thrown rings. 
It has been one of my favourite go-to patterns when travelling. The medallions were later joined with a wavy scroll with opposing medallions, thus functioning as motifs. 

Medallions – never too meddlesome when tatted !